If you are aged 13 or over and want to earn some useful extra cash delivering the Champion Newspaper in your area give us a call on 01704 392345
Caring vet nurse is bats about wildlife!

Caring vet nurse is bats about wildlife!

by Danielle Thompson (September 2021)

A VET nurse who is ‘bats about wildlife’ is raising awareness of the need to care for animals across Sefton.

Ashley Pounder, 27, from Southport, who works at Parker & Crowther Vets’ surgeries in Formby, Maghull and Birkdale, has helped dozens of sick, injured or orphaned wild animals and birds and has even been known to take them home until they’re well enough to be released back into their natural habitat.

In the last few years, she has helped a fox that suffered a fractured leg after being hit by a car, bats that have been attacked by cats, a young tawny owl tangled in a football net, hedgehogs suffering from dehydration during the heatwave and head-reared baby rabbits, hedgehogs, rats, mice, pigeons and jackdaws.

To further her knowledge and ability to care, Ashley is studying for an Advanced Veterinary Nursing Certificate in Zoological, Exotics and Wildlife, including avian, reptiles, amphibians, small mammals, wildlife and zoo animals.

The course covers a range of topics from anatomy and physiology, through nutrition, anaesthesia, emergency and critical care, fluid therapy, husbandry and nursing of common diseases. She has just passed the wildlife nursing section.

Ashley said: “I’ve always had a keen interest in exotics and wildlife even before I went into veterinary nursing as I find them really fascinating.

“We have lots of wildlife brought into the practice and I enjoy the challenge of looking after them.

“I feel that the skills I’ve developed through working with wildlife and from doing my advanced certificate have much improved the quality of care we have been able to provide to wildlife in the practice providing advice and education in the community.

“Everything is given a chance if it is ethical, able to survive and we are able to nurse it back to health and then release it again back into the wild.

“It is not always in the animals best interests to be brought in and it is sometimes better to let nature take its course.

“I am also a volunteer with the Bat Conservation Trust and we see a lot of bats in practice if they have been attacked by cats or had their habitat disturbed by new building developments. We also had a juvenile tawny owl brought in after it was caught in a football net in the rain and was waterlogged, cold and hungry.

“We have had a lot of baby rabbits brought in this summer and the heatwave has led to a lot of hedgehogs being brought in due to the heatwave as they struggle to find water when it’s so hot.”



Read the Champion Newspapers online

Search for news

Popular in the last 7 days